Recent Posts

Crooked is the line at QHC in Vancouver

Crooked is the line at QHC in Vancouver

I had a blast at the Qualitative Health Research Conference in Vancouver leading a fantastic workshop on comics in qualitative research and giving a keynote lecture. The Zine workshop was a longer version of my classic studio experience, tailored for a diverse group of researchers…

Comics and Ethnography at Oxford

Comics and Ethnography at Oxford

I was very excited to be attending and presenting a work-in-progress paper at the Oxford Ethnography and Education conference this coming week at New College, Oxford University. This conference is a highlight of my year: It’s a chance to workshop and improve a paper while…

comics in ethnographic research

comics in ethnographic research

As Sonya Atalay writes in the introduction to our collaborative, creative collection in American Anthropologist, “In our hypervisual culture, presenting research in a visually engaging way can have a powerful and democratizing impact. Visual methods, such as comics and animation, aid us in telling engaging, memorable stories about our work. Storytelling is an important skill in the research tool kit; it brings much-needed creativity to our work lives and to our research while at the same time helping to democratize knowledge and fulfilling our ethical responsibilities to share scholarship outside the academy . . . In different ways, we each present drawing and visual our research to others beyond our discipline. Several of us use these forms of creative work as teaching tools. Discussing creative process and sharing our visual pieces, we present a range of ethnographic work, including a new graphic narrative focused on NAGPRA law and Native American repatriation, drawings used as reflexive practice, comics that help us grapple with uncomfortable data and fieldwork experiences while resisting the urge to reduce complexity, lessons about how graphic novels can be both an object of analysis and a product in a class on violence studies, and students’ experiences learning in class how to translate their research about Indigenous peoples and heritage into comics.We close with a discussion of several key themes that we recognize winding through these diverse approaches to creating research-based graphics and visual work” (Atalay et al, 2019, p. 769).

In this collection I get to appear alongside the brilliant Sonya Atalay, who organized our panel and my performance at the Anthropology meetings a few sessions ago, as well as John Swogger, Letitzia Bonnanno, Sarah Jacqz, Ryan Rybka, Jen Shannon, Cary Speck and Erica Wohlencheck. Not only am I so honored to appear alongside my esteemed colleagues, I am thrilled to be a part of this very different sort of publication. As cartoonists and other artists try to reach new and diverse publics with our material, linking to longer and more in-depth visual material — as this piece does– represents an innovation in printed form.

You can access the full length piece here @ American Anthropologist and the complete link to the entire piece here (the original link in the article is not working): http://www.americananthropologist.org/ethno-graphic-galman

Galman, S. C. (2019). Not a mirror, but an icon: Ethnographic comic art in three acts. In, Atalay, S., Bonanno, L., Galman, S. C., Jacqz, S., Rybka, R., Shannon, J., Speck, C., Swogger, J., & Wolencheck, E. (Contributors), Ethno/graphic storytelling: Communicating research and exploring pedagogical approaches through graphic narratives, drawings and zines. American Anthropologist,121 (3), 769-770.

Cookies and Tea and Gender Diversity in Pittsburgh

Cookies and Tea and Gender Diversity in Pittsburgh

The only thing better than being invited to the University of Pittsburgh is being asked to speak in the Cathedral of Learning, and the only thing better than that is to know that there will be tea and cookies! Come one come all!

AEQ is 50!

AEQ is 50!

Laura and I were contemplating our very last year as Editors in Chief of AEQ when we realized that we were ending our watch on volume 50! Wow! Our Note from the Editors reflects our interest and innovations in publishing creative work, and we hope…

Writers on writing

Writers on writing

An oldie but goodie, my conversation with Dr. Kakali Bhattacharya. Food for thought as we all wrestle with what it means to be scholars and writers in the cold and quiet of the winter semester. We had a great time, and you can watch it here: https://youtu.be/SD_ydK58MuM

Mouse Nest

Mouse Nest

At long last, I am an actual, bonafide, legit, published poetess! I am over the moon. My poem, Mouse Nest, is an example of ethnographic poetry. As Cahnmann and Maynard (2010) write,  Poetry is one important place where ethnographers can explore tensions thatemerge between the…

Send your work to the nice people at Jeunesse!

Send your work to the nice people at Jeunesse!

It is often difficult to find just the right place to publish critical, interdisciplinary work in childhood studies. However, I am lucky enough to be one of the editors at Jeunesse, where we publish a wide variety of pieces from the humanities, social sciences and…

Call for proposals for new AEQ Editorial Team

Call for proposals for new AEQ Editorial Team

Anthropology and Education Quarterly
Call for a new editor or editorial team


The Council on Anthropology and Education (CAE) calls for proposals to provide editorial stewardship for its journal, Anthropology and Education Quarterly (AEQ) for a three-year term to begin on January 1, 2020 and conclude on December 31, 2022. AEQ is a peer-reviewed journal that draws on anthropological theories and methods to examine educational processes in and out of schools, in US and international contexts. Articles rely primarily on ethnographic research to address immediate problems of practice as well as broad theoretical questions. The fundamental responsibility of the new editor(s) will be to expertly guide the solicitation, peer review, selection, and publication of articles and special issues. The editor(s) will be expected to safeguard collegiality in the field and promote authors’ intellectual development and career progress by providing timely and constructive reviews, publication decisions and publication of accepted manuscripts. Responsibilities will also include promoting the journal, the field, and researchers by providing presentations, workshops and materials to potential authors at the American Anthropological Association meetings and other relevant professional meetings.

Proposal Considerations
A successful proposal will articulate: a clear vision for journal stewardship; highly qualified leadership grounded in educational anthropology; a plan for the timely processing, review, and publication of high quality manuscripts grounded in educational anthropology; an infrastructure that includes institutional support (e.g. physical space, finances, dedicated graduate assistants or other staffing); and special features such as a plan for mentorship of junior authors or graduate student reviewers and staff, outreach at conferences, or dynamic use of social media. Proposals will be assessed according to vision, organizational structure and financial infrastructure.
Vision:
AEQ is a well-established journal, the flagship for Council on Anthropology and
Education, and the flagship for the educational anthropology generally. What will be the signature elements of you or your team’s journal stewardship? WIll there be a special emphasis on developing any specific aspect of journal content (e.g. field reflections, academic articles, book reviews, special issues) in any specific direction? What will be you or your team’s approach to promoting collegiality in the review process, mentorship of junior authors or enhancing the standing of the journal among educational researchers?
Organizational Structure:
Who will be on the team? What roles and responsibilities will be covered and by whom? What are the intellectual leaders’ and participants’ primary disciplinary inclinations? Beyond an editor (or editors) and a managing editor, roles may include but are not limited to associate editors, special issue editors, graduate assistants, or an active board of reviewers. CVs of key personnel should be appended to the proposal.
Financial Infrastructure:
Provide an annual budget, expectation of support from the Council on Anthropology and Education and a brief, clear budget narrative that includes a statement of direct and in-kind institutional support. Letters of institutional support should be appended to the proposal.

Contacts and Deadline

Potential applicants should contact CAE incoming President Peter Demerath (pwd@umn.edu) with queries regarding the budget, the publication process in the context of our parent organization and publisher, or other aspects of AEQ’s operations.


Send proposals as a single PDF document to CAE Treasurer Eric Johnson (e.johnson@wsu.edu) and CAE incoming President Peter Demerath (pwd@umn.edu). The proposal deadline is April 1, 2019.

SHANE RIDES AGAIN!

SHANE RIDES AGAIN!

  Hi Folks!  I promised you all not one but two separate NEW books this fall and I did NOT disappoint. The second edition of the one and only original SHANE is out! You can find out all the information here on the publisher website.…